Marine

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How does an aquarium sump work?

Sumps can be used on any aquarium but are most popular with marine keepers. In essence, a sump is another aquarium attached to the main one. They are usually placed in the cabinet underneath but can even be placed above a tank and run “upstream.” Multiple tanks can be attached to one centralized sump, and that method is popular with local fish stores for keeping lots of fish in lots of tanks ...

What eats cyanobacteria in a reef tank?

Cyanobacteria is often mistaken for algae but as the name suggests its a bacteria, not an algae at all. It can come in all colours from blue/green (hence the Cyan part of its name,) to deep red, and its the red slime which is the most prevalent in marine aquariums. Cyano does behave like an algae however, being photosynthetic, and thriving in brightly lit tanks. It loves to spread across rocks, s...

How to get rid of Aiptasia in a reef tank

Aiptasia are the bain of many a reefkeeper’s life, and they can get so bad that people leave the hobby because of them. But you can get rid of them by trying one or all of the following methods. Avoid introducing themThis one sounds obvious but it happens all the time. Aiptasia are introduced to reef aquariums on corals, live rock and portions of macroalgae. Start your reef aquariu...

What’s the difference between hard corals and soft corals?

Swell UK Marine Coral Advice

Hard corals are so-called because they build a hard skeleton as they grow, which is left behind when they die. Hard coral skeletons are what people used to use as ornaments in the 1970s and they are characteristically white and spiky. This type of coral is known as reef-building coral, as its those skeletons which remain on the reef, building it up in height, before more hard corals colonise and ...

What to feed corals in a reef tank

One of the greatest advances in reefkeeping in the last few years has been in nutrition. Photosynthetic corals get nutrition in two ways - via their symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic zooxanthellae algae during the day time, and via their polyps at night time. And its advances in feeding the actual coral polyps, along with improvements in lighting, which has meant that corals can now feed...

How to control hair algae in a reef tank

Hair algae is the common name for the green filamentous algae that grows in reef tanks. Its most common in new aquariums where the surfaces are new, clean and bright, the system is fully mature, and there is a lack of algae-eating livestock.What causes hair algae in a reef tank?Hair algae is caused by bright light and nutrients like phosphate, and it will often grow on rocks first but can...

How to test alkalinity in a reef tank

Alkalinity, also known as KH, dKH or Carbonate Hardness is one of the most important parameters in a reef tank. Control KH and you will be well on the way to success as it is as important as salinity, and temperature.The KH in the oceans is 7-8 and when you mix up most saltwater that’s the KH you will start off with. Some Pro or Reef salt recipes have a higher KH to offer a degree of buffer...

How to set up a nano reef tank

Getting into marines in a small way? Here’s how:TankTo be classed as a nano marine tank, it should be 50 litres or less, although bigger is always better for marine, and all tanks, even large ones, are nano when compared to the ocean. Bigger tanks are more stable when it comes to temperature and water conditions, and they enable you to keep more of the iconic reef fish.Tangs, for e...

How to treat Ich in a reef tank

Clown Fish

Ich is an abbreviation of the word Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, the scientific name for Whitespot. Strictly speaking, Whitespot is a freshwater only disease, and the Whitespot we see on fish in marine tanks is caused by a parasite called Cryptocaryon irritans, not Ichthyophthirius, but the symptoms look similar so the name has stuck.If a fish gets Cryptocaryon in a marine tank it can be real...

How to raise Calcium in a reef tank

Calcium is one of the elements we recognise the most. Its what’s in our bones and teeth, and we ourselves obtain calcium from milk and dairy. Corals need Calcium too and if they aren’t doing well, after addressing light and water flow, Calcium is usually the thing we think we need to raise first.But reef chemistry isn’t as simple as that and corals consume many more elements including M...

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